100+ New York City Crime Statistics

min read
Updated: 29 January 2024
Written by
Lacey Jackson-Matsushima
On this page Open

Looking at New York City crime statistics by year gives a better idea of how misdemeanor and felony offenses have fluctuated from year to year.

In New York City there are seven major felony offenses which include vehicle theft, house burglaries, and fatalities.

There are major felony offenses that do not fall under these categories such as arson, drug and weapon charges, as well as sex crimes.

In New York City there are several categories for misdemeanor offenses including possession of stolen property, driving under the influence, and misdemeanor vehicle and traffic law offenses.

New York City crime statistics over the last 22 years paint a clear picture of very high crime rates across all categories of felonies and misdemeanors around the year 2000 with slight decreases and a period of significantly reduced crime from 2013 until 2019.

Other data indicates that 2019 had the lowest levels of historical crime data, possibly the result of changes to policing regulations compounded by the initial lockdown requirements for covid. However, data indicates that all of these categories have seen an uptick in crime over the last two years.

Key Takeaways

  • Across the board all areas of New York City crime statistics indicate that over the last 22 years crime rates for major felony and misdemeanor offenses were at their highest levels in 2000.

  • All levels of crime started to decrease over the next few years and between 2013 and 2019 experienced the lowest rates of crime historically during the last 22 years.

  • Since 2019 New York City crime statistics indicate that several felony and misdemeanor offenses have increased to numbers that match pre-2013 figures.

New York City Crime Statistics by Year: House Burglaries

When reviewing data over the last 22 years, New York City crime statistics indicate that house burglaries were at their highest in 2000 but they dropped by over 50% not 10 years later. The best time frame with the lowest number of house burglaries was between 2013 and 2019. However, those rates have increased since covid lockdown measures have been lifted.

  • 105: In the year 2000 there was an average of 105 house burglaries in New York City every day.
  • 50: In the year 2010 the rate of daily house robberies across New York City averaged 50.
  • 42: In the year 2020 the average number of house burglaries per day in New York City was down to 42.
  • 38,352: Over the last 22 years, the year 2000 had the highest number of house burglaries in New York City at 38,352.
  • 10,783: 2019 during the covid lockdown had the lowest number of house burglaries in New York City at only 10,783, nearly one quarter of what took place in 2000 and one half the rate of 2008.
  • 18%: Between 2021 and 2022 the number of average house burglaries increased by 18%.
  • 28%: There was a 28% difference in the New York City crime statistics by year for house burglaries between the highest number of annual cases in the lowest number of annual cases in 2000 and 2019 respectively.

Source: NYC Crime

The table below outlines the number of reported cases for house burglaries from 2000 until 2022:

Year Number of House Burglaries in New York City
2000 38,352
2001 32,763
2002 31,275
2003 29,110
2004 26,976
2005 24,117
2006 23,143
2007 21,762
2008 20,725
2009 19,430
2010 18,600
2011 18,720
2012 19,168
2013 17,429
2014 16,765
2015 15,125
2016 12,990
2017 12,083
2018 11,687
2019 10,783
2020 15,478
2021 12,811
2022 15,746

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics by Year: Robbery

Robbery is considered one of the seven major felony offenses in New York City. Robbery, like all of the other seven major felony offenses, saw a gradual decline in the number of cases between 2000 and 2004 with a small uptick in 2005 followed by a gradual decline particularly starting at 2013.

  • 32,562: Over the last 22 years, the year 2000 had the highest number of robberies averaging 32,562 annually.
  • 12,913: Over the last 22 years 2018 had the lowest number of robberies at 12,913.
  • 39%: There was a 39% difference in the New York City crime statistics by year for robbery between the highest number of annual cases in the lowest number of annual cases in 2000 and 2018 respectively.
  • 89: In the year 2000 there were 89 robberies per day on average.
  • 53: In the year 2010 there were an average of only 53 robberies per day.
  • 35: In the year 2020 there were only an average of 35 robberies per day.

Source: NYC Crime

The table below provides a look at the last 22 years worth of annual robbery data:

Year Number of Robberies in New York City
2000 32,562
2001 28,202
2002 27,229
2003 25,989
2004 24,373
2005 24,722
2006 .23,739
2007 21,8009
2008 22,401
2009 18,601
2010 19,486
2011 19,717
2012 20,144
2013 19,128
2014 16,539
2015 16,931
2016 15,500
2017 13,956
2018 12,913
2019 13,371
2020 13,106
2021 13,831
2022 17,411

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics by Year: Vehicle Thefts

In New York City Grand Larceny of Motor Vehicle rates have gone down over the past 22 years although they remain quite high today. Vehicle theft numbers remained at their lowest between 2017 and 2019 but between 2019 and 2020 rates of vehicle theft nearly doubled. They have continued to rise by a third each year since.

The table below outlines the number of reported cases for vehicle theft valued at over $1,000 from 2000 until 2022:

Year Number of Vehicle Theft Cases in New York City
2000 35,442
2001 29,531
2002 26,656
2003 23,413
2004 20,884
2005 18,246
2006 15,745
2007 13,174
2008 12,482
2009 10,670
2010 10,329
2011 9,314
2012 8,093
2013 7,400
2014 7,664
2015 7,332
2016 6,326
2017 5,676
2018 5,424
2019 5,430
2020 9,037
2021 10,415
2022 13,749

Source: NYC Crime

  • 35,442: In the last 22 years the highest rate of vehicle theft was in the year 2000 at 35,442 thefts per year.
  • 5,424: The lowest rate of vehicle theft was in 2018 when there were only 5,424 vehicle thefts reported in the year.
  • 6.53x: There was a 6.53x increase in the New York City crime statistics by year for vehicle thefts between the highest number of annual cases in the lowest number of annual cases in 2000 and 2018 respectively.
  • 2013-2019: Between 2013 and 2019 New York City experienced the lowest levels of vehicle theft.
  • 97: In the year 2000 there were 97 car thefts per day on average in New York City.
  • 28: In the year 2010 the number of average car thefts per day was only 28 in New York city.
  • 24: In the year 2020 the number of average car thefts per day was only 24 in New York city.
  • 14: In the year 2018 there were only an average of 14 car thefts per day in New York city.

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics by Year: Fatalities

When reviewing crime data for murder rates across New York City there was a steady decline historically between 2000 and 2005 with an uptick in 2006. Starting in 2013 crime dropped to its lowest rate and remained at nearly half of what it was in the year 2000 until the year 2020.

  • 2017: 2017 had the lowest number of fatalities through voluntary and involuntary murder since 2000, at only 292.
  • 2000: The year 2000 had the highest number of murders in New York City over the last 22 years, at 673 murders.
  • 2013-2019: 2013 through 2019 had the lowest historical murders over the last 22 years with an average of 300 murders per year.
  • 149: The year after the 2019 lockdown, fatalities in New York City increased by 149 compared to 2019.
  • 1.2: In 2022 there were 1.2 murders every day in New York City.
  • 1.8: In 2000 20 there were 1.8 murders every day in New York City.

Source: NYC Crime

The table below outlines the rates of murder, both involuntary and voluntary from 2000 until 2023:

Year Number of Murders in New York City
2000 673
2001 649
2002 587
2003 597
2004 570
2005 539
2006 596
2007 496
2008 523
2009 471
2010 536
2011 515
2012 419
2013 335
2014 333
2015 352
2016 335
2017 292
2018 295
2019 319
2020 468
2021 488
2022 438

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics: Other Felony Offenses

In New York city, there are several felony offenses that do not fall under the seven major categories and these include:

  1. A felony charge for possession of stolen property
  2. Identity theft
  3. Arson
  4. A third charge for felony sex crimes
  5. A felony charge for Dangerous drug possession
  6. A second charge for dangerous weapons possession
  7. Felony criminal mischief

The table below indicates the annual totals for the remaining felony offenses over the last 22 years:

Year Number of Other Felony Charges in New York City
2000 80,861
2001 75,078
2002 70,993
2003 61,217
2004 66,733
2005 67,854
2006 .69,028
2007 70,958
2008 .68,958
2009 83,760
2010 59,387
2011 57,240
2012 56,902
2013 57,650
2014 56,869
2015 56,520
2016 58,346
2017 54,907
2018 52,667
2019 51,484
2020 41,015
2021 46,635
2022 53,136

Source: NYC Crime

Crime rates for all other felony offenses in New York City declined from the year 2000 until 2005 at which point there were a few years of increased activity until the year 2010. Crime rates for all other felony offenses including identity theft, drug charges, and possession of stolen property went up exponentially right after the economic crash of 2008 with the highest rates in the last 22 years showing up in the year 2009.

However, following an economic stimulus package, those rates dropped by over 30%. From that point on rates began to drop marginally with a steep drop during the covid lockdown.

  • 2009: 2000 had the highest rate of all other felony offenses at  83,760.
  • 2020: 2020 had the lowest rate of all other felony offenses in the last 22 years at only 41,015.
  • 13%: There was a 13% increase in all other felony offenses between 2021 and 2022 when covid lockdown parameters were lifted.
  • 221: In the year 2000 there was an average of 221 felony offenses every day of the year.
  • 162: By the year 2010 the average number of felony offenses every day in New York City dropped to 162.
  • 112: In the year 2020 the number of felony offenses every day averaged only 112.
  • 27%: Between 2021 and 2010 the number of total felony offenses dropped by 27%.
  • 50%: Between 2000 the year 2000 and 2020 the number of total felony offenses dropped by an average of 50%.

New York City Crime Statistics: Misdemeanors

New York misdemeanors gradually decreased from 2000 until 2013 at which point there was a dramatic decrease over the next several years until 2020 when misdemeanors hit their lowest levels at 214,263 per year. This was likely owing in large part to the covid lockdown measures.

Since those measures have been lifted, there has been a slight increase in the annual rate of misdemeanors across the city.

The table below provides the annual rates of misdemeanors across New York City over the last 22 years:

Year Number of Misdemeanor Charges in New York City
2000 435,405
2001 403,903
2002 379,026
2003 365,471
2004 357,724
2005 353,649
2006 361,574
2007 378,616
2008 380,406
2009 388,765
2010 391,892
2011 383,108
2012 374,365
2013 359,350
2014 348,371
2015 322,848
2016 314,925
2017 300,354
2018 271,630
2019 256,038
2020 214,263
2021 228,632
2022 273,599

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics: Criminal Trespass

Out of the several misdemeanor offenses in New York state criminal trespass is often linked to things such as robbery and burglary. but New York City crime statistics indicate that Criminal Trespass has dropped steeply over the last 22 years and continues to drop in 2022.

The table below provides the annual rates of criminal trespass across New York City over the last 22 years:

Year Number of Criminal Trespass Misdemeanor Charges in New York City
2000 14,053
2001 11,262
2002 11,442
2003 13,204
2004 12,496
2005 13,376
2006 14,241
2007 16,306
2008 18,734
2009 20,904
2010 19,858
2011 18,297
2012 15,719
2013 13,456
2014 14,540
2015 11,473
2016 9,799
2017 8,218
2018 6,445
2019 5,405
2020 3,194
2021 2,771
2022 3,322

Source: NYC Crime

New York City Crime Statistics: Possession of Stolen Property

A misdemeanor charge of possession of stolen property has seen a sharp increase between 2009 and 2013 at which point it begins to drop by half and continues to drop through present day. Statistics indicate that the sharp increase for possession of stolen property began around the same time as the fallout from the 2008 economic crash but, like all New York City crime, began to deteriorate around 2013.

The table below provides the annual rates of possession of stolen property charges across New York City over the last 22 years:

Year Number of Possession of Stolen Property Misdemeanor Charges
2000 1,072
2001 1,382
2002 1,577
2003 1,781
2004 1,856
2005 1,827
2006 2,009
2007 1,880
2008 1,811
2009 2,023
2010 2,240
2011 2,853
2012 2,662
2013 2,337
2014 1,469
2015 1,145
2016 932
2017 956
2018 835
2019 697
2020 466
2021 514
2022 685

Source: NYC Crime

2013-2019: Low Crime Rates

New York City crime statistics show two very clear things:

  1. First, the year 2000 had some of the highest levels of reported crime in the last 22 years.
  2. Second, the time frame between 2013 and 2009 had the lowest level of crime, with crime figures not only dropping drastically compared to years prior but remaining relatively stable.

There are several explanations for these two items.

Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg, aggressive policing tactics were initiated particularly after 9/11. This resulted in some of the highest levels of New York City crime rates in the last 22 years. This explains the high levels of felony and misdemeanor crimes particularly around 2000 through 2006.

However, these policing tactics were ruled unconstitutional, like the stopping and frisking measures in 2013, shifting New York City crime statistics to their historically low levels. Around that time Bill De Blasio had been elected the new mayor for New York City and he invested heavily in expanding nonprofits to reduce violence, building out a crisis management system within the city, and setting up a new program for public housing.

At the same time, prosecutors and judges were encouraged to seek alternatives to incarceration. City Council members provided police officers with the freedom to issue civil summons for low-level crimes rather than criminal summons. These types of tickets meant that individuals charged with misdemeanors or other violations could be given a ticket requiring them to appear in court rather than arresting them.

Violent crimes were drastically reduced, shootings went down, burglaries, robberies, other felonies and misdemeanors all saw a sharp decline during this time frame.

As the number of police officers remained steady and funding remained steady but diverted into more appropriate economic policies, New York City saw some of its lowest levels of crime during this time frame until the pandemic.

Go back to top