Best Pet Insurance For Poodles In 2024

In my professional opinion, Healthy Paws offers the best pet insurance for Poodles.

min read
Updated: 23 January 2024
Written by
Bob Phillips
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Poodles, beloved for their friendly temperament and intelligence, are popular breeds known for their elegance and versatility. Originating from Germany, they excel as companions and working dogs due to their adaptability and trainability. With a curly or corded coat, they come in various colors, including black, white, apricot, and silver.

Energetic and sociable, Poodles thrive in active families and enjoy outdoor activities. Their keen sense of smell and agility make them adept at various canine sports and activities. As loyal companions, Poodles form strong bonds with their owners, displaying affectionate and playful behavior. Renowned for their intelligence and versatility, Poodles continue to capture the hearts of dog lovers worldwide.

If you own a Poodle, you’re undoubtedly concerned about its health and well-being. As a pure breed, a Poodle is more likely to suffer from genetic health issues than mixed-breed dogs. Unfortunately, 4 out of 5 pet parents can’t pay for an unexpected $500 veterinary bill out-of-pocket. However, pet insurance will help you reduce your financial risk.

In this review, we’ll look at some of the top pet insurers for Poodles and help you pick the policy that best meets your needs. You’ll find that pet insurance is much like personal health insurance; it provides better treatment options and limits out-of-pocket costs. But unlike private health insurance, it won’t cost you an arm and a leg.

Best Pet Insurance Companies For Poodles, 2024

Different pet insurance companies for Poodles are the same in many ways in that they will help ensure your pet is cared for and that your financial risk is limited, but they’re also different in some ways. So while one company may be best for your neighbor’s pet, another may be better for yours.

Here’s our breakdown of the best pet insurance companies for Poodles:

healthy-paws
Best Overall - Healthy Paws
Lemonade
Best Cheap Coverage - Lemonade
manypetsicon-logo
Best For Puppies - Many Pets
Best Pet Insurance, Poodles, 2024

Compare The Best Pet Insurance Companies For Poodles

As you can see from our breakdown of the best pet insurance companies for Poodles shown above, many high-quality companies are vying for the top spots. You can also see that each has its own particular strengths. Here’s a snapshot to give you a glance into each insurer:

Overall Rating Best For Waiting Period Reimbursement % Benefit Limit Get A Quote
Healthy Paws
4.9

Overall

15 days accident/illness

70%, 80%, 90%

Unlimited annual and lifetime

Instant Quote
Lemonade
4.8

Cheap

2 days accident, 14 days illness

70%, 80%, 90%

$5,000 to $100,000 annually

Instant Quote
Many Pets
4.8

Puppies

15 days accident/illness

70% or 80% (Most States)

Unlimited annual and lifetime

Instant Quote
Pumpkin
4.7

Older Dogs

14 days accident/illness

90%

$10,000 , $20,000 or unlimited

Instant Quote
Spot
4.7

Multiple Pets

14 days accident/illness

70%, 80%, 90%

$2,500 to unlimited

Instant Quote
Scroll to see comparisons

Our Methodology

Opinions and subsequent ratings were based on reviewing each insurer's website, customer reviews, other review sites, and personal experience having purchased and used pet insurance in the past.

40

Quotes Analyzed

25+

Years Of Industry Experience

18

Brands Reviewed

32+

Research Hours

Detailed Reviews Of The Best Poodle Insurance Companies


Best Overall

Overall Rating
4.9

Key Statistics

9/10 Affordability
9/10 Customer Satisfaction
9.9/10 Claims
10/10 Coverage Level

Why We like Them

Healthy Paws is the best pet insurance because it has no maximum on claim payouts, per-incident maximum, or caps. This means paying more, but it’s worth it to avoid putting pets down due to policy limits. Healthy Paws has one easy-to-understand policy, no costly add-ons, and allows you to use any licensed veterinarian. Submitting claims is simple through their mobile app or website, with most claims processed within two days.

Benefits & Drawbacks

Benefits
  • No maximum annual or lifetime payouts
  • Most claims processed within two days
  • 30-day money-back guarantee
  • Direct vet payments may be possible
Drawbacks
  • No routine wellness option

Runner-Up For Best Overall

Overall Rating
4.8

Key Statistics

10/10 Affordability
9/10 Customer Satisfaction
9/10 Claims
8/10 Coverage Level

Why We Like Them

We found Lemonade to be the cheapest pet insurance for Poodles. While the limits are comparable to those of other companies we reviewed, they are not unlimited like those of Healthy Paws. Lemonade’s coverage limits range from $ 5,000 to $ 100,000 per year, with the premium increasing along with the limit you select.

Lemonade’s standard policy covers accidents and illnesses, including cancer, heart disease, skin conditions, broken bones, and hip dysplasia, a common ailment among older Poodles. Like most insurers, Lemonade doesn’t pay for medical costs for preexisting conditions, dental illnesses, behavioral issues, or elective procedures.

Benefits & Drawbacks

Benefits
  • Optional wellness plan available
  • Accident waiting coverage period of only two days
  • You get a 10% discount by bundling pet insurance with home, renters, or car insurance you have with Lemonade
Drawbacks
  • No 24/7 pet telehealth line
  • Coverage for vet exam fees has to be added for an extra cost
  • No coverage for prescription food or microchipping

Best For Puppies

Overall Rating
4.8

Key Statistics

10/10 Affordability
9/10 Customer Satisfaction
9/10 Claims
8/10 Coverage Level

Why We Like Them

ManyPets has the most favorable coverage for puppies. Pre-existing coverages don’t affect the rates, cured conditions may be covered after 18 months, and unrelated conditions are still eligible for coverage.

Like all pups, young Poodles can suffer from illnesses like poisoning, ingesting foreign bodies, and accidents stemming from their youthful energy. Covering them when they’re younger makes it far less likely that you’ll ever run into exclusions for pre-existing conditions when they’re older.

Benefits & Drawbacks

Benefits
  • Available in more than 40 states
  • Covers vet exam fees for illness and accident visits
  • Offers optional wellness plans
Drawbacks
  • No 24/7 pet telehealth line
  • Doesn’t cover pet behavioral therapy
  • No coverage for alternative therapies

Best For Older Dogs

Overall Rating
4.7

Key Statistics

10/10 Affordability
9/10 Customer Satisfaction
9/10 Claims
8/10 Coverage Level

Why We Like Them

As Poodles age, they are prone to genetic illnesses that can lead to costly treatments, namely cruciate ligament issues and hip dysplasia. Pumpkin has no special waiting period for these conditions and covers veterinarian exam fees if you have to take your older Terrier treatment.

Pumpkin has a good selection of coverage options for a wide range of problems Poodles can experience, including surgeries and dental illnesses. You get a choice of three different deductibles and 90% reimbursement is standard.

Benefits & Drawbacks

Benefits
  • Optional wellness plan available
  • Discounts for insuring multiple pets
  • 90% reimbursement for dogs and cats 8 weeks and older
Drawbacks
  • No 24/7 pet telehealth line
  • No accident-only plan is available

Best For Multiple Pets

Overall Rating
4.7

Key Statistics

9/10 Affordability
9/10 Customer Satisfaction
8/10 Claims
10/10 Coverage Level

Why We Like Them

Many Poodle owners have multiple pets since Terriers have such an amiable disposition. Spot provides a 10% discount for insuring more than one pet with them, which can add up to a lot of savings.

Spot’s optional preventive care plan provides coverage for wellness care, such as one annual visit to the vet, one fecal test, and one teeth cleaning. Some vaccinations are also covered.

Spot offers a 30-day money-back guarantee if you’re unsatisfied with the coverage or service. Spot also reimburses up to 90% on eligible vet bills, in addition to a 24/7 vet helpline. In addition, you can visit any U.S.-licensed veterinarian or specialist.

Benefits & Drawbacks

Benefits
  • Covers microchipping
  • Low $100 deductible is available
  • Has a 24/7 pet telehealth line
Drawbacks
  • Accidents have a 14-day waiting period, compared to 2 days with some top competitors

Average Cost Of Pet Insurance For Poodles

Company Deductible Annual Reimbursement % Monthly Price Age Of Dog
Healthy Paws $500 70% $70 5 year old
Lemonade $500 70% $40 5 year old
Spot $500 70% $73 5 year old
Healthy Paws $500 80% $37 1 year old
Lemonade $500 80% $21 1 year old
Spot $500 80% $54 1 year old
Healthy Paws $500 70% $38 3 month old
Lemonade $500 70% $29 3 month old
Spot $500 70% $83 3 month old

Common Health Issues For Poodles

Purebred dogs, such as Poodles, often face health challenges. Over time, some breeders may have overlooked genetic considerations during Poodle breeding, resulting in issues that affect the entire Poodle population. In general, Poodles tend to be more susceptible to genetic health problems compared to other breeds.

Here are some of the most common health issues for Poodles:

  • Cataracts
  • Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Epilepsy
  • Addison’s Disease

Cataracts

Cataracts, a prevalent concern in Poodles, involve the clouding of the lens within the eye, leading to impaired vision or eventual blindness if untreated. This condition obstructs light from entering the eye, making it challenging for the Poodle to perceive its surroundings clearly.

Cataracts can develop due to aging, genetic predisposition, or secondary to other health issues. Timely surgical intervention to remove the cataracts is often recommended to restore vision. Regular eye check-ups are vital to monitor and manage cataracts, maintaining the Poodle’s visual comfort and overall quality of life.

Cataract surgery for dogs can cost between $2,500 and $4,000. The actual cost may vary depending on factors such as location, the number of eyes affected, and the size of the dog.

Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease

Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease is a musculoskeletal disorder commonly observed in Poodles, particularly the toy and miniature varieties. This condition involves the spontaneous degeneration of the femoral head, the “ball” part of the hip joint, due to inadequate blood supply.

As a result, the affected hip joint deteriorates, causing pain, lameness, and muscle atrophy in the hind limbs. Early detection through physical examinations and diagnostic imaging is crucial for effective treatment. Typically, surgical intervention involves removing the affected femoral head, allowing the Poodle to regain mobility and lead a relatively normal, pain-free life.

The cost of treating Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease in dogs can vary depending on the severity of the condition and the recommended treatment options. Surgical treatment, such as femoral head ostectomy, can cost around $1,500 to $4,000

Patellar Luxation

Patellar luxation is a frequent orthopedic issue in Poodles, where the kneecap (patella) dislocates or moves out of its normal position, causing intermittent or persistent lameness and discomfort. This condition can be congenital or develop over time due to muscular abnormalities or injury.

Poodles with patellar luxation may exhibit a skipping gait or sudden lameness in their hind limbs. Treatment varies depending on the severity, ranging from monitoring and physical therapy for mild cases to surgical correction for severe cases. Early diagnosis and appropriate intervention are essential to ensure a good prognosis and enhanced mobility for the Poodle.

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that Poodles may experience, characterized by recurrent seizures or convulsions due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain. These seizures can vary in intensity and duration, causing a range of symptoms from momentary confusion to severe muscle spasms.

While the exact cause is often unknown, epilepsy in Poodles can be managed with antiepileptic medications and lifestyle adjustments. Regular monitoring and close collaboration with a veterinarian are crucial to tailor the treatment plan and improve the Poodle’s quality of life while managing this chronic condition.

The cost of treating patellar luxation in dogs can range from a few hundred dollars for medication and physical therapy to several thousand dollars for surgical options such as corrective surgery. The average cost of patellar luxation surgery is around $1,500 to $3,000.

Addison’s Disease

Addison’s Disease, or hypoadrenocorticism, is a hormonal disorder that can affect Poodles. It occurs when the adrenal glands fail to produce adequate amounts of essential hormones like cortisol and aldosterone. This imbalance can result in symptoms such as weakness, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration.

Addison’s Disease requires lifelong management with hormone replacement therapy and careful monitoring of the Poodle’s health. With proper treatment and regular veterinary care, affected Poodles can lead fulfilling lives, mitigating the impact of this chronic condition on their overall well-being.

The cost of treating Addison’s Disease in dogs can vary depending on the severity of the condition and the recommended treatment options. The cost of medication for Addison’s Disease can range from $50 to $100 per month.

Average Cost Of Typical Vet Procedures

Typical Vet Procedure Average Cost Of Procedure
Puppy vaccinations $75-100
Flea & tick prevention $40-200
Heartworm prevention $24-120
Spay or neuter surgery $200-800
Annual exam $240-600
Teeth cleaning $200-500
Microchip $40

Average Cost Of Emergency Vet Procedures

Emergency Pet Procedure Average Cost Of Procedure
General consultation/exam $100-$150
General bloodwork $80-200
X-rays $150-$250
Ultrasound $300-$600
1-2 day hospitalization $600-$1,700
3-5 day hospitalization $1,500-$3,500
Wound treatment & repair $800-$1,500
Emergency surgery $800-$2,500
Oxygen therapy $500

Is Pet Insurance Worth It For Poodles?

Pet insurance protects against unexpected veterinary bills. Many pet owners pay out-of-pocket for their pet’s medical expenses, but most Americans can’t afford a $1500 emergency vet bill. The right pet insurance can literally be a lifesaver. Having coverage will give you the freedom to make medical decisions for your furry family member based on the quality of life, not finances.

The value of pet insurance is largely based on your expectations. If your pet is currently undergoing treatment for a chronic condition and you would like help with the cost of the treatment, you will likely be disappointed as no company in our review covers preexisting conditions.

But, if you understand your policy and what it does and doesn’t cover and have a policy that fits your budget and needs, you are far more likely to consider the policy worth it.

How To Find The Best Pet Insurance Company For You

The costs and types of pet insurance plans available on the market vary by company, making choosing one over the others challenging. To find the best plan for your pet, consider these tips before applying for coverage:

Check Whether Your Pet Is Eligible

Puppies and kittens often must be a minimum of 6 to 10 weeks old to be insured, depending on the company. Senior pets may not be eligible for first-time enrollment with some companies, or they may qualify for accident coverage only. Once the pet is enrolled, though, most plans will offer coverage for life as long as you continue paying the premiums.

Research What’s Covered

Pet insurance plans typically cover expenses like surgery, hospitalization and medication if your pet gets sick or hurt. However, there are certain things that some companies charge extra for or won’t cover at all. Here are a few examples:

  • Exam fees. Say your dog breaks her leg. Some plans will reimburse expenses like X-rays,  surgery and pain medication, but not the vet’s exam fee.
  • Alternative treatments and rehabilitation. Some companies include coverage for things like acupuncture and physical therapy in their standard plans. Others charge extra.
  • Behavioral therapies. Not all policies cover veterinary treatment for aggression or other behavioral issues.
  • Prescription food. Certain plans won’t cover food or supplements at all, even if your vet prescribes them for a covered condition.
  • Dental care. Pet insurance plans vary widely when it comes to caring for your pet’s teeth. For example, your policy may not cover dental illnesses such as gingivitis or periodontal disease. Alternatively, it may cover them only if your pet has had a recent tooth cleaning. Some add-on wellness plans pay for cleanings.

Note that pet insurance policies usually won’t cover pre-existing conditions, cosmetic procedures, or breeding expenses.

Decide How Much Coverage You Want

Most pet insurance plans cap the amount they pay out per year, although some have no annual limit. Only you can decide the amount that gives you reasonable peace of mind for paying vet bills.

If your dog or cat is relatively healthy, you might go years without paying for anything but routine care. But an unexpected surgery or serious illness could add up to thousands of dollars in expenses.

Understand Reimbursements And Deductibles

Most pet insurance plans reimburse you for a percentage of your vet bill. You can generally choose a reimbursement level — such as 70%, 80% or 90% — when you buy the plan.

Other plans pay what the insurance company deems a standard fee for a given treatment, which might be less than what your vet charges. You’d be responsible for the remainder.

Most plans also have a deductible — the dollar amount you pay out of pocket before the policy pays. You can usually choose from a range of deductibles, such as $100, $250, or more. Some plans apply deductibles to each injury or illness that’s treated. Most have you pay the deductible every year.

Generally, the lower your out-of-pocket costs are, the more you’ll pay for coverage. Alower deductible and higher reimbursement rate can lead to a higher premium, while a higher deductible and lower reimbursement rate can mean a lower premium.

Check Waiting Periods

Most plans include short waiting periods after you purchase the policy for general accident and illness coverage, such as 14 days. Your plan won’t pay for any treatment during the waiting period.

Some plans include longer waiting periods for coverage of certain conditions, such as cruciate ligament injuries — a common orthopedic problem for dogs. The cruciate ligaments help stabilize the knee; when injured, it can make it difficult for a dog to walk.

Examine Extra Costs

Some pet insurance companies offer coverage for routine services such as well visits and vaccinations. While this may sound tempting, do the math to determine whether it’s worth the extra cost. Compare the annual price of the wellness insurance plan with the amount you’d pay each year on your own for services the plan covers. Read the details because the items covered for “wellness” vary by pet insurance company.

Compare Quotes

The cost of insurance varies by carrier and the amount of coverage. Some pet insurers offer discounts; you might be able to save money by insuring more than one pet, for example. But a discount doesn’t guarantee the plan is the best deal.

The only way to find the best insurance for your pet is to dig into the details and get quotes for several plans. Make sure you’re making a fair comparison with similar coverage amounts, deductibles, and reimbursement limits.

Factors That Impact Cost Of Your Pet Insurance Policy

Similar to your health insurance plan, your pet insurance price is going to vary depending on certain factors, such as:

  • Where you live. Pet insurance companies take the cost of vet care in your area into account when pricing your policy.
  • Your pet’s age. Because older animals are more likely to have health problems, their premiums are generally higher.
  • Your pet’s breed. Certain breeds are more prone to health issues. For example, bulldogs and Boston terriers often develop breathing problems, while German Shepherds and other large breeds are more likely than others to get hip dysplasia. These potential problems may be reflected in the cost of your pet insurance plan.
  • Your deductibles, coinsurance and coverage limits. The less you’re willing to pay out of pocket for your pet’s care, the higher your pet insurance premium will be. For instance, choosing a $100 deductible instead of a $500 one means your plan will start reimbursing you sooner for your pet’s care — but it’ll cost you more in premiums.

FAQs

Is pet insurance cheaper for purebred dogs?

Because purebreds are more likely to have a genetic predisposition to costly diseases and conditions, they are likely to cost more to insure than mixed-breed dogs.

What is the average cost of owning a Poodle?

First-year costs are about $3,000 for vaccinations, food, grooming, and insurance, but the price drops to around $1,900 for each year after.

What insurance do you need for a dog?

A dog should have some level of pet insurance so the owner can pay vet bills that will keep their dog healthy and secure.

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